20090222

Iron Paint or Patina Finishes

A faux painted metal patina can be applied to any paintable surface or object. Plain wrought iron can be faux painted to look like pewter, rust, silver, copper, bronze, gold, aluminum, or platinum. Chemical antiquing patinas can be added to create a subtle, aged look. A natural verdigris patina is created when copper is exposed to the elements; it turns a chalky, grayish, colored green. When trying to copy the natural aging process for verdigris, below are the steps to take in order to achieve this look.

Verdigris Finish Steps:
First paint the base coat white, apply a second coat of gray, sponge or brush on the dark green, blending any obvious harsh marks with a stippling brush, while still wet, sponge on the darker turquoise mixture, blend, add the milky turquoise color with a brush to create highlights, and dust with rotten stone or spackle dust. To simulate a streaking, soak a sponge in water (water-based paint) or mineral spirits (oil-based) and dribble down the wet paint finish.

Creating a natural rust finish: It’s time consuming, but works.
If you’ve purchased an iron piece of furniture and would like for it to rust a little, here are the steps to take in order to accomplish the look.
1. Randomly sand areas of the iron, getting it down to the bare steel.
2. Set the piece outdoors if possible
3. Get a spray bottle and fill it with water, put a teaspoon of salt in, spray the area’s that need to rust on a regular basis.
4. It really helps if you live in a rainy area, leave it exposed enough to get wet by rain or sprinklers.

This process takes a little while; it will start to turn an orange color first. It will slowly start rusting into more of a dark brown. Your pretty much there by now, you can take it in and lightly rub it down with a dry rag, knocking the rough edges off. Then it’s time to seal it, I like to use a spray satin Rustoleum Polyurethane from the hardware store. It could use two light coats, letting each one dry for at least 24 hours. Then you’re ready to go.

2 comments:

maddie said...

I am thinking about refinishing my brass fireplace doors----I want an interesting bronze/black finish which of course will have to be heat resistant because we do use the fireplace. The existing brass does have a clear coat of some kind on it.

Any suggestions?

Maddie

Justin Hodges said...

It would be really tough to get the clear coat off of the brass in order to get a good patina coating. So, I recommend doing a faux type finish with an acrylic type paint. Depending on the color your looking to accomplish, start with a satin spray for the first coat, then go to hobby lobby and get some little paints in squeeze tubes. Dry brush one or two different colors over the first coat and then finish up with a matte clear spray for protection. Don't worry about the fire hurting it, the doors are too far away from the heat to really do anything.